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Spring 2020 Events

 

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Following University guidelines, all University-affiliated events with more than 50 people, both on- and off-campus, have been canceled or postponed until further notice. Events that will instead be held virtually will be noted in the description.

Some events have been rescheduled for Fall 2020. Please visit a listing of those events here.

 

TBD: Countering Islamophobia

More information to follow.


“Reflections on Race and Medicine”

This event is being rescheduled for fall 2020.

Dr. Damon Tweedy, Duke University associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, will deliver a free lecture titled “Reflections on Race and Medicine.” He is the author of the bestselling book, Black Man in a White Coat (2015), which vividly describes his first-hand experience of racism, prejudice and discrimination as a black physician-in-training in North Carolina. Tweedy’s talk will be linked to two College courses: ENGL071H: “Healers and Patients” and ENGL264/ANTH272: “Healing in Literature and Ethnography.”

Co-sponsored by Carolina Seminar: Health Humanities Grand Rounds and the HHIVE Lab.


September 2020: “Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil” with author Susan Neiman

Hosted by the Center for European Studies and director Kathleen Shanahan Lindner, Susan Neiman’s public talk will focus on “comparative redemption,” findings and comparisons between Germany and the US, and how each country has dealt with its past.

 

Past Events

Kenneth Stern discussed “Antisemitism as a Form of Hate” as the signature event in the College’s Countering Hate initiative on November 7, 2019. Read more about his lecture, “Antisemitism as a Form of Hate.” (photo by Donn Young)

 

Chris Buckley (left) and Heval Kelli shared about their unlikely friendship and the value of overcoming differences at a campus workshop on Oct. 5.
Chris Buckley (left) and Heval Kelli shared about their unlikely friendship and the value of overcoming differences at a campus workshop on Oct. 5.

 

“More in Common” workshop highlighted overcoming differences

Students, faculty and staff learned about an unlikely friendship between a Kurdish refugee and a U.S. military veteran and reformed white supremacist as the two shared their story of combating hate and bridging divides at a workshop on Oct. 5.

Heval Kelli, a former Kurdish refugee and a cardiologist, and Chris Buckley, a native of Georgia, a veteran of the Iraq War and a reformed white supremacist, shared their story in a “More in Common” workshop for campus student leaders in the FedEx Global Education Center. The event was part of the Countering Hate initiative. Twenty-seven students, faculty and staff represented a range of campus departments and organizations.

The friends shared their experiences in an open dialogue with student leaders, including:

  • How to build relationships with neighbors who have opposing views
  • How to teach empathy towards those different from us
  • How to conduct and facilitate discussions on competing views
  • How to foster active listening and compassion in our communities
  • How to communicate with many members of our communities, given our varied backgrounds.

Kelli and Buckley met through another reformed white supremacist and after some initial skepticism, became friends and met each other’s families. Since then, they have been on a mission to share their story of overcoming differences and letting go of anger and hate.

Their stories are multifaceted, and Kelli and Buckley said they both have experienced significant trauma. But together they said they are welcomed into communities they might not reach alone. They talked with participants about finding some common ground to start a conversation and then actively listening. They discussed going into conversations without having the goal of changing someone’s mind, which can lead to the person shutting down. They both advised that sharing your stories helps to open the conversation — and to be humble and respectful when doing so.

With an ultimate goal of continuing to listen and build bridges across campus and in the community, student leaders will go forward and share what they have learned with their respective organizations and beyond.

For more on the friendship between Kelli and Buckley, watch a trailer for a documentary film being made about them: https://www.clarkstonfilm.com/.


October 11, 1:30 p.m.: Difficult Discourse: The Language of Confederate Monuments and Racial Conflict

Difficult Discourse: The Language of Confederate Monuments and Racial Conflict Friday, Oct. 11, 2019 1:00-5:00PM University Room, Hyde Hall. Space limited, register at tinyurl.com/diffdiscourse Invited Speakers: Elaine Chun (University of South Carolina), Laura Hart (Wilson Special Collections Library), Atiya Husain (University of Richmond), Kumi Silva (Communication department), Armond Towns (University Richmond Co-sponsors: Department of Political Sciences; Department of Linguistics; Department of Communication; Institute for the Arts & Humanities
Click to view full flyer

Location: University Room, Hyde Hall

Space is limited; registration required: https://tinyurl.com/diffdiscourse

After the toppling of the Confederate monument known as Silent Sam on the UNC campus in August 2018, there was considerable discourse on campus about the history of the statue and the social and political implications of its presence, its removal and its possible restoration. These were (and are) needed conversations. But missing from the discussion was a critical awareness of how we were talking about this monument. Linguistics professor Misha Becker and political science professor Mark Crescenzi will host a public forum to hear individual 30-minute talks by experts in relevant areas, plus an open discussion with panelists from a diverse range of disciplines whose work touches on issues related to language and race, language and power, language and politics, and discourse on war memorials. Invited speakers include Elaine Chun (University of South Carolina), Laura Hart (Wilson Special Collections Library), Atiya Husain (University of Richmond), Kumi Silva (Communication department), Armond Towns (University Richmond). The talks and panel discussion will be research-driven and research-focused: How does one conduct research on these difficult and emotionally fraught topics?


October 23, 7:00 p.m.: The Jews as a Class: Between Race and Religion in the Civil War South

Location: Hill Hall

The Center for Jewish Studies’ Margolis lecture for 2019-2020 is with Shari Rabin, Oberlin College.

One of the most infamous instances of American antisemitism is General Ulysses S. Grant’s 1862 General Order Number 11, which banned “Jews, as a class” from the Department of Tennessee. This presentation will revisit this language of southern Jews “as a class” in historical context, showing how Jews and non-Jews alike struggled to categorize Jews in a region – and a nation – dominated by Protestant religion and a rigid racial binary.

Shari Rabin is assistant professor of Jewish studies and religion at Oberlin College. She is the author of Jews on the Frontier: Religion and Mobility in Nineteenth-century America (NYU Press, 2017), which won the National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies and was a finalist for the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. She received a PhD in religious studies from Yale University in 2015 and taught at the College of Charleston from 2015 to 2019.

Directions/Parking.


As One workshop flyerOct. 30, 7:30 p.m.: As One – Panel Discussion/Open Rehearsal

Person Recital Hall

In this workshop of As One, audience members will be taken behind the scenes to observe the process of staging this innovative chamber opera. Through discussions and the presentation of one or two selections from the opera, this will be a physical and vocal exploration of how one character can live in two bodies and how transformation can be both difficult and freeing. We will also be exploring voices from the local trans community and their intersection with this story.

As One will be part of Carolina Performing Arts’ season on February 19-20 2020, which will feature two voices sharing the part of a sole transgender protagonist. The production will include locally based advisors and cast members, including Marc Callahan from UNC’s Department of Music and earspace, a Raleigh-based ensemble directed by UNC alumnus Vincent Povázsay.

 


November 7, 5:30 p.m.: Understanding Antisemitism as a Form of Hate

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium

Kenneth SternKenneth S. Stern, director of Bard College’s Center for the Study of Hate, will give a talk titled “Understanding Antisemitism as a Form of Hate” on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 5:30 p.m. in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Center.

For 25 years Stern was the American Jewish Committee’s expert on antisemitism. He was the lead drafter of the “Working Definition of Antisemitism,” later adopted by the U.S. State Department.

He has argued before the U.S. Supreme Court and testified before Congress. He was an invited presenter at the White House Conference on Hate Crimes and an official member of the U.S. delegation to the Stockholm International Forum on Combating Intolerance.

Stern was part of the defense team in the historic Holocaust denial case of David Irving vs. Deborah Lipstadt. He was counsel for American Indian Movement co-founder Dennis Banks, and his resulting book, Loud Hawk: The United States vs. The American Indian Movement, won the Gustave Myers Center Award as outstanding book on human rights. His book about the Oklahoma City bombing – A Force Upon The Plain: The American Militia Movement and the Politics of Hate – was nominated for the National Book award. His other books are Holocaust Denial and Antisemitism Today. His forthcoming book is titled The Conflict Over the Conflict: The Israel/Palestine Campus Debate.

Stern’s op-eds have appeared in the New York TimesWashington PostUSA TodayThe Forward, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency and elsewhere. Stern has appeared on the CBS Evening NewsDatelineGood Morning AmericaFace the Nation, the History Channel, PBS, and on NPR’s Fresh Air and All Things Considered.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences, UNC Global and the Gillings School of Global Public Health.

Painful Hope An Israeli Settler and Palestinian Activist in Dialogue Join Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger, an Israeli, and Shadi Abu Awwad, a Palestinian, as they share the successes and challenges of their groundbreaking grassroots organization, Roots: A Local Palestinian Israeli Initiative for Understanding, Nonviolence and Transformation. 7 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 13 Toy Lounge (4th Floor), Dey Hall UNC-Chapel Hill campus (Weeknight parking guidelines: move.unc.edu) This event is part of the Countering Hate: Overcoming Fear of Differences initiative. Learn more at college.unc.edu/counteringhate.
Click to view full size.

November 13, 7:00 p.m.: Painful Hope: An Israeli Settler and Palestinian Activist in Dialogue

Location: Toy Lounge (4th floor), Dey Hall

We invite you to join Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger, an Israeli, and Shadi Abu Awwad, a Palestinian, as they share their personal, interconnected stories and present the successes and challenges of their groundbreaking grassroots organization, Roots: A Local Palestinian Israeli Initiative for Understanding, Nonviolence and Transformation. Weeknight parking guidelines: move.unc.edu.

Come early to enjoy refreshments from Mediterranean Deli.


Promotional flyer for 'What Might We Remember on Holocaust Remembrance Day?'January 27, 5:30 p.m.: Annual Holocaust Remembrance Day Event: Why Did the Holocaust Happen?

Location: Moeser Auditorium, Hill Hall

The injunction to commemorate or to remember a historical event leaves open the question of what precisely should be remembered. In the case of the Nazi Holocaust of European Jewry, the injunction usually implies that those who remember something about it are more likely to be on guard against its recurrence than those who carry no such memory, but what that something might be has never been spelled out. In this lecture a veteran historian of the Nazi Holocaust will examine aspects of the historical situation in which the Holocaust took place and will explore the ways in which understanding those aspects may help guide policymakers concerned with preventing similar catastrophes in the future.

David Engel is Greenberg Professor of Holocaust Studies, Professor and Chair of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, and Professor of History at New York University. Professor Engel is the author of six books on aspects of twentieth-century Jewish history and historiography, including: In the Shadow of Auschwitz; Facing a Holocaust; and, most recently, Historians of the Jews and the Holocaust.

The event is by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.


Clockwise from top left, stills from “Felicia” (1965), “Behind Every Good Man” (1967), “Siu Mei Wong: Who Shall I Be” (1970), and “Goodbye to Carolina” (1964). Up Close and Personal: Challenging Prejudice in 1960s DocumentaryFebruary, 10, 7:00 p.m.: “Up Close and Personal: Challenging Prejudice in 1960s Documentary”

Varsity Theatre, Chapel Hill, NC

Free admission. Total run time of film program: 65 minutes.

This program will feature four short films that address the topic of prejudice by focusing on individual experiences of racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination. Three of these films (Felicia, Behind Every Good Man and Siu Mei Wong: Who Shall I Be) are discussed in a new edited collection, Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film, which was published by Duke University Press in November 2019. The fourth film, Goodbye to Carolina (Dir. Clive Hewitt, 1964, 27 minutes), was filmed on the campus of the University of North Carolina in May 1964, and features interviews with students at North Carolina A&T about their experiences of discrimination in the state. Collectively, these intimate portraits of everyday encounters with prejudice and hate give us both insight into how young people in the 1960s addressed hate, and also a model for how media can be used productively to give us insight into the lives of people who are most affected by hate. After the screening, a panel discussion with Martin L. Johnson, Charlene Regester, Marsha Gordon and Skip Elsheimer (AV Geeks).


Screencapture of 'As One' from Carolina Performing Arts ticketing page.
Purchase tickets at the Carolina Performing Arts’ website.

February 19-20: As One, a chamber opera

Location: CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio. 

Feb. 20 performance has been postponed due to inclement weather. Carolina Performing Arts is working with the artists to reschedule this event, and will send all ticketholders more information on that as soon as possible. Existing tickets will remain valid for a rescheduled event. More at https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/ros_perf_series/as-one/.

There is Hannah before, and there is Hannah after. In As One, two voices share the part of a sole transgender protagonist, tracing Hannah’s experiences from her youth in a small town to her college years.

The story weaves a narrative of Hannah’s life and experiences from childhood through to self-discovery as an adult, tackling both humous moments and some very serious issues that affect the trans community. This opera is an opportunity for conversation, listening, and learning on the UNC campus and in the greater community.

Through discussions and the presentation of one or two selections from the opera, this will be a physical and vocal exploration of how one character can live in two bodies and how transformation can be both difficult and freeing. We will also be exploring voices from the local trans community and their intersection with this story. CPA’s staging of this powerful chamber opera will include locally based advisors and cast members, including Marc Callahan from UNC’s Department of Music (in the role of Hannah Before), mezzo-soprano Melina Jaharis and earspace, the Raleigh-based ensemble directed by UNC alumnus Vincent Povázsay.

The production is also supported by the Carolina Women’s Center.

Tickets $27, available at Carolina Performing Arts’ website.


Cropped poster of 'The Far Right on College Campuses'
Click to view full poster.

POSTPONED:

February 20, 5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m.: “The Far Right on College Campuses: Behind the Decades-Long Effort to Undermine Higher Education and Destroy Democracy”

Location: Graham Memorial, room 039

Postponed due to expected inclement weather. New date to be announced.

When tiki-torch carrying protestors marched on the campus of the University of Virginia in August, 2017, many observers were shocked at the presence of white supremacists on a college campus. They needn’t have been. Months before, white supremacists had been organizing in face-to-face meetings and online to oppose the removal of a Confederate statue on campus. While many regard these protests as the expression of a “lunatic fringe,” far from the mainstream, in fact, they are much closer to the core values of American higher education than many are comfortable acknowledging.

In this engaging talk, sociologist Jessie Daniels draws on over 25 years of research into white supremacy – and personal experience of being attacked by the far right – to present the very real, and persistent, threat the far right poses for higher education and for democratic societies.

Jessie Daniels is a Faculty Associate at the Harvard Berkman Klein Center, a Full Professor of Sociology at Hunter College, and affiliated faculty in Africana Studies, Critical Social Psychology and Sociology at The Graduate Center-CUNY. She is an internationally recognized expert who has studied Internet manifestations of racism for more than twenty-five years. She is the author of White Lies (Routledge, 1997) and Cyber Racism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), which explore white supremacist use of media, and editor of Digital Sociologies (Policy Press 2017). Her current book project is Tweet Storm: The Rise of the Far Right, the Mainstreaming of White Supremacy, and How Tech and Media Helped. She was named a “pioneer in digital sociology” by the American Sociological Association and presented her research in 2019 to the United Nations.

Co-sponsored by the Countering Hate Initiative, the Department of English & Comparative Literature, the Center for Information, Technology & Public Life and the Institute for the Arts & Humanities.


Flyer: Film & Workshop. Lost World & A River Changes Course with director Kalyanee Mam. Tuesday, March 3March 3: Film screening and workshop with filmmaker Kalyanee Mam

3:00 p.m.: FedEx Global Education Center room 4003

7:00 p.m.: FedEx Global Education Center Nelson Mandela Auditorium

On March 3, two events will feature Cambodian-born filmmaker Kalyanee Mam, whose work focuses on the concepts of home, displacement and belonging. Her films and lived experience as a refugee from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia shed light on themes of environmental destruction (and justice) and the intangible culture that is lost (and sometimes rediscovered or reestablished) in the lives of displaced peoples.

Workshop and screening of short film Lost World: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Singapore dredges sand out from beneath Cambodia’s mangrove forests, and an ecosystem, a communal way of life, and one woman’s relationship to her beloved home are faced with the threat of erasure.

Screening of A River Changes Course: 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Through the stories of three young Cambodians, A River Changes Course explores the damage rapid development has wrought in Cambodia on both a human and environmental level. It won the Grand Jury Prize for World Documentary at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.

Mam’s visit is sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center, Southeast Asian Approaches Faculty Working Group, Department of Communication, Department of Geography & Carolina Public Humanities. It is part of the Countering Hate Initiative.


Poster for: Rituals of Resilience: Imagining Survival A free public performance by Rhodessa Jones and the Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women. Thursday, March 5, 2020 / Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. 150 South Road, Chapel Hill 7:00-8:30PM. To be followed by a talk back session
Click to view full poster.

March 5, 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.: Rituals of Resilience: Imagining Survival

Location: The Sonja Haynes Stone Center Auditorium

‘Rituals of Resilience: Imagining Survival’ is a free public performance by San Francisco-based artist, director, and performer Rhodessa Jones and members of The Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, an award-winning performance workshop committed to incarcerated women’s personal and social transformation. A talk-back session will follow the performance.

Rhodessa and her group explore dramatic performance as a means of women reclaiming their lives through the creative process. Rituals of Resistance is an evening of storytelling rooted in truth-telling as a means of women (ex-offenders, poets, dancers and singers) utilizing autobiography and giving voice to our personal experiences in celebrating our journeys. The performance is a tapestry made up of stories birthed over several decades of cultivating the incarcerated woman’s voice. She too is testifying and navigating the landscape of “me too” as well as honoring the sacred circles that make up the culture of womanhood in a world gone mad.

On Friday, March 6, the artists will participate in further conversation with small groups. Limited space is available; contact Patricia Rosenmeyer (patanne@email.unc.edu) or Al Duncan (acduncan@email.unc.edu) for more information.

The event is sponsored by the department of classics, with financial support of the Stone Center for Black Culture and History, the Countering Hate initiative and the Performing Arts Special Activities Fund.


CANCELED: March 17, 2:00 p.m.: “Memoir of a Race Traitor: Fighting Racism in the American South”

Location: Toy Lounge, Dey Hall

In 1994, Mab Segrest first explained how she “had become a woman haunted by the dead.” Against a backdrop of nine generations of her family’s history, Segrest explored her experiences in the 1980s as a white lesbian organizing against a virulent far-right movement in North Carolina. Memoir of a Race Traitor became a classic text of white antiracist practice. Juxtaposing childhood memories with contemporary events, Segrest described her journey into the heart of her culture and how she finally veered from its violent trajectory and moved towards place of hope and renewal.

Mab Segrest is Professor Emerita of Gender and Women’s Studies at Connecticut College. She is the author of several books including the forthcoming Administrations of LunacyRacism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry at the Milledgeville AsylumA longtime activist in social justice movements and a past fellow at the National Humanities Center, she lives in Durham, North Carolina.

This guest lecture is in support of English and Comparative Literature teaching associate professor Elyse Crystall’s ENGL 265 course, “Literature of Race, Literature of Ethnicity: Disposable People, Disposable Lives,” which centers on several racial and ethnic groups who have been subjected to hate in its many forms throughout the 20th and 21st centuries (mostly in the US).


UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities Keynote lecture: Dr. Ruth Zambrana, “Reclaiming Our Place and Rights in Higher Education Spaces: Underrepresented Faculty Moving from the Margins to the Center”Canceled.

We greatly regret that due to the concerns about COVID-19, the symposium for Mar. 20 and all associated events on Mar. 18-20 with Dr. Ruth Zambrana have been canceled.

March 20, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: Keynote with Ruth Enid Zambrana: “Reclaiming Our Place and Rights in Higher Education Spaces: Underrepresented Faculty Moving from the Margins to the Center” 

Location: Hyde Hall, University Room

The Institute for the Arts and Humanities will host a symposium in collaboration with its Faculty of Color & Indigenous Faculty Group with a public talk by keynote speaker Ruth Enid Zambrana, author of Toxic Ivory Towers: The Consequences of Work Stress on Underrepresented Minority Faculty, titled “Reclaiming Our Place and Rights in Higher Education Spaces: Underrepresented Faculty Moving from the Margins to the Center.”

Zambrana is Professor and Interim Chair in the Department of Women’s Studies, Director of the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity and adjunct Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine.

The lecture is free and open to the public. RSVP Eventbrite here.


March 22, 7:30 p.m.: A Walking Tour of UNC Monuments — Listening for Voices Unheard

Canceled.

Tour begins at the Old Well

Dance professor Heather Tatreau will lead a contemplative walking tour to explore the complicated history of UNC’s monuments through dance performance and spoken word. Local artist Meredith Haggerty will lead this contemplative walk to several campus monument sites, allowing the participants to experience a new narrative of familiar spaces and question whose voices are being heard.

This tour is presented in partnership with Carolina Performing Arts, which will include stops into the surrounding Chapel Hill community during the second half of the evening with Chapel Hill’s Poet Laureate, CJ Suitt. The tour is free and open to the public.


Promo for Revisiting Discourses of Love, Sex, and Desire in Modern Iran and Diaspora symposium with art by Minoo Emami.March 28: “Revisiting Discourses of Love, Sex, and Desire in Modern Iran and Diaspora” one-day symposium

Due to concerns regarding the spread of the COVID-19, this symposium has been postponed.

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005

The Persian studies program presents this one-day symposium as an attempt to provide a safe space for public discussions of the nuances around discourses of love and desire in modern Iran, challenging and contributing to the dominant discourses on key topics. From their mundane to their sublime forms, love and desire have played a central role in various discourses in modern Iran. From romantic epics to ghazals, and from arranged marriages to white marriages, and from companionate love to contemporary cohabitations, desire is undoubtedly one of the most important theoretical topics for scholars. This symposium brings together a range of scholars from different disciplines focusing on modern Iran to analyze the wide variety of ways in which love and desire have been represented, imagined, and discursively constructed. Participants will address discourses of love and desire and revisit those discourses considering the implications that they have for larger theoretical debates.

Selected papers of the symposium will be published in the book series titled, Sex, Marriage, and family in the Middle East, edited by Janet Afary and Claudia Yaghoobi, published by Bloomsbury. Other selected papers will appear as a special issue in the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies.

See a full list of speakers and presenters at go.unc.edu/iran-symposium.


April 14, 2:00 p.m. — 3:00 p.m.: “Moving Towards Just Space: A Palestinian Reimagining of the Academic Campus”

Canceled.

Location: Dey Hall, Toy Lounge

Diya Abdo, department of English at Guilford College, will deliver a talk titled “Moving Towards Just Space: A Palestinian Reimagining of the Academic Campus.” Refugees are cast, both in policy and the public imaginary, as those to be quarantined on the margins and in the ghettos of society – separate and apart. In this talk, the founder and director of a national organization that mobilizes colleges and universities to host refugees on campus grounds and support them in resettlement, discusses the ways in which the Palestinian refugee experience undergirds the political reimagining of one of the bastions of exclusive spaces (the academic campus) towards a more accountable and just space.

Abdo is an Associate Professor of English at Guilford College; the Founder and Director of Every Campus A Refuge (ECAR), a Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award Recipient 2019, and an Arab Hope Makers Award Finalist 2018.

This guest lecture is in support of English and Comparative Literature teaching associate professor Elyse Crystall’s ENGL 265 course, “Literature of Race, Literature of Ethnicity: Disposable People, Disposable Lives,” which centers on several racial and ethnic groups who have been subjected to hate in its many forms throughout the 20th and 21st centuries (mostly in the US).


April 16 – April 18: The Uhlman Family Distinguished Scholar Program

Canceled.

Hosted by Carolina Public Humanities in collaboration with the Center for Jewish Studies and the Center for European Studies

The Uhlman Family Distinguished Scholar Program for 2020 will feature Christopher Browning, Frank Porter Graham Professor Emeritus at UNC-Chapel Hill. This special event, co-sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, will feature historical perspectives from a leading global expert on Nazi Germany, the Holocaust, and the demise of democracy in Europe during the 1930s.

The program begins Thursday with a public reception at 6:00 pm and a public talk at 7:00 pm, focusing on responses to Professor Browning’s classic book, Ordinary Men, and his recent work on Holocaust perpetrators. Professor Browning’s presentation on Friday will examine similarities and differences that appear in the democratic crises of the 1930s and the present historical era. It will be followed by a panel discussion with UNC-Chapel Hill faculty and graduate students. Generous private support makes it possible for this program to be free and open to the public.

Ordinary Men Revisited: The Evolution of Holocaust Perpetrator Studies featuring Christopher Browning

Thursday, April 16, 6:00–8:15 pm | FedEx Global Education Center
Public Reception in the Atrium
Lecture in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium

Two Crises of Democracy: The Interwar Period and the Present featuring Christopher Browning

Friday, April 17, 2:00–4:30 pm | University Room, Hyde Hall, Institute for the Arts and Humanities
Panel Discussion and Audience Responses follows the talk


April 17, 2:00 p.m.: Linguistic Discrimination Within and Beyond the Academe

Canceled.

Location: Wilson Library, Pleasants Family Assembly Room

Directed by Brian Hsu (assistant professor, linguistics department), this event will include a 40-minute presentation by Jeffrey Reaser (North Carolina State University), followed by a 1-hour panel discussion with UNC faculty to reflect on concrete efforts that can be made at many levels at UNC to foster an equitable environment for our diverse community of speakers.


April 23, 5:00 p.m.: Film screening, The Aryans

Canceled.

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, room 1009

There will be a public film screening of Mo Asumang’s documentary The Aryans, followed by a discussion led by College of Charleston associate professor Joshua Shanes. The Aryans (2014) is a documentary about right-wing movements worldwide and their completely incorrect interpretation of “Aryanism,” a phenomenon which began with French philosopher Gobineau and continued with the Nazis. Black German filmmaker Mo Asumang embarks on a journey into the madness of racism and meets German neo-Nazis, America’s most notorious racist Tom Metzger and members of the KKK in the Midwest. English subtitles.

Shanes is an associate professor and associate director of Jewish Studies at College of Charleston. His research interests focus on Central and East European Jewry in the 19th and 20th centuries, specifically turn-of-the-century Galicia and the rise of Zionism as a counter-movement to the traditional Jewish establishment.


 

 

Related events of interest:

There are a number of additional events happening around the UNC community this semester that are not sponsored specifically by the Countering Hate initiative, but are connected to the themes. Some of these include:

Trifonia Melibea Obono: "I Did Not Want to Be a Mother: On LGBTQ Rights and Livelihood in Equatorial Guinea." November 14, 5:30PM: Trifonia Melibea Obono: “I Did Not Want to Be a Mother: On LGBTQ Rights and Livelihood in Equatorial Guinea.” 

Trifonia Melibea Ozono is an award-winning LGBTQ writer, scholar and activist from Equatorial Guinea. The talk will be in Spanish with English translation available. Refreshments served.

Sponsored by the African Studies Center, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, Department of Romance Languages, Curriculum in Global Studies, Humanities for the Public Good, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, Carolina Seminars, Global Relations and Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life.

 

Through Dec. 1: She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World exhibition

Ackland Art Museum

During this critical time for Iran and the Arab world, as national and personal identities are being dismantled and rebuilt, contemporary photography reflects the complexities of unprecedented change. One of the most significant trends to emerge is the work of women photographers, whose remarkable and provocative images provide insights into new cultural landscapes, questioning tradition and challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern and Arab identity. “She Who Tells a Story” brings together the vital pioneering work of 12 leading artists, ranging in genre from portraiture to documentary: Jananne Al-Ani, Boushra Almutawakel, Gohar Dashti, Rana El Nemr, Lalla Essaydi, Shadi Ghadirian, Tanya Habjouqa, Rula Halawani, Nermine Hammam, Rania Matar, Shirin Neshat, and Newsha Tavakolian. The exhibition features over 80 photographs, lent by the artists, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach.